How To Start PrEP For HIV Prevention

I wanted to share a quick guide on how to start PrEP and what you can expect with your first appointment, getting your prescription, testing as well as how to start taking the medication.

As the process is a little different for gay cis gendered men and everyone else I will be doing two versions linked below:

Starting PrEP For Cis Males Having Sex With Other Men

Step One. Book an appointment with a doctor who understands and is familiar with prescribing PrEP.

How to Start PREP CIS Males Step 1

The first step of getting started with PrEP is to book an appointment with a PrEP prescriber.

There are a number of important topics to talk through before you start PrEP.

  • Your current risks for aquiring HIV
  • Your current medical issues
  • Any medications you are already taking

For gay men there are a number of different ways to be able to take PrEP. This is an excellent opportunity to discuss whether you wish to take PrEP daily or whether intermittent or “PrEP on demand” may be a suitable option for you.

Step 2. Your doctor will provide you with a prescription for PrEP medicine.

Your doctor will be able to provide you a prescription for 3 months of PrEP medication.

If you are happy to proceed your doctor will provide you with a prescription for PrEP. If you have medicare you will be able to collect PrEP from your local pharmacy. If you do not have access to medicare it may be more economical to import PrEP from overseas. Your doctor can explain how this is done.

Step 3. Your doctor will organise a full sexual health screening.

Your doctor will organise a full STI screening as well as a check of your kidneys.

This is an excellent opportunity to check your blood pressure, physical health and organising a full STI screening.

A full sti screening includes:

  • Throat swab for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Rectal swab for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Urine testing for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Blood test for HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis
  • Kidney function testing
  • Screening can also check for any ulcers, sores, warts or rashes that may indicate other sexually transmitted infections.

Step 4. On your first day take 2 tablets of PrEP 2-24 hours before sex.

For CIS MSM, gay men born male, you will need a loading dose of 2 tablets 2 -24 house before sex

To ensure there is enough medication in your body tissues you need to take 2 PrEP tablets 2 to 24 hours before you have your first episode of sex.

Step 5. From day 2 onwards, take one tablet of PrEP every day

From day 2 you just need to take a single tablet of PrEP every day.

From day 2 you just need to take a single tablet of PrEP every day. While it does not have to be at the exact same time every day, doing so can help you keep a routine. Some people set an alarm on their phone or use a pill taking app to help avoid missed tablets.

Step 6. Visit your doctor every 3 months for a new script and STI screening.

Every three months you will need to get a new prescription and STI screening tests

Regular follow up is an important part of your PrEP treatment. Every three months you will need to come back for a new prescription as well as a set of STI tests. This is a great chance to talk with your doctor about any potential side effects of issues you may have had.


Starting PrEP For Women, Trans People & Heterosexual Men.

Step One. Book an appointment with a doctor who understands and is familiar with prescribing PrEP.

How to Start PREP CIS Males Step 1

The first step of getting started with PrEP is to book an appointment with a PrEP prescriber.

There are a number of important topics to talk through before you start PrEP.

  • Your current risks for aquiring HIV
  • Your current medical issues
  • Any medications you are already taking

Your doctor will be able to explain the potential side effects, benefits, and how to best take PrEP for preventing HIV infection.

Step 2. Your doctor will provide you with a prescription for PrEP medicine.

Your doctor will be able to provide you a prescription for 3 months of PrEP medication.

If you are happy to proceed your doctor will provide you with a prescription for PrEP. If you have medicare you will be able to collect PrEP from your local pharmacy. If you do not have access to medicare it may be more economical to import PrEP from overseas. Your doctor can explain how this is done.

Step 3. Your doctor will organise a full sexual health screening.

Your doctor will organise a full STI screening as well as a check of your kidneys.

This is an excellent opportunity to check your blood pressure, physical health and organising a full STI screening.

A full sti screening includes:

  • Throat swab for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Rectal swab for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Urine testing for chlamydia & gonorrhoea
  • Blood test for HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis
  • Kidney function testing
  • Screening can also check for any ulcers, sores, warts or rashes that may indicate other sexually transmitted infections.

Step 4. To get protective levels of PrEP in the body you need to take 7 days of tablets.

1 tablet of PrEP for a week will ensure there is enough medicine in the body to be protective.

By taking a daily tablet of PrEP for one week you will have enough medicine in the tissues of the body to ensure you are protected against HIV. It is best to ensure you are using condoms for the first week of PrEP while you wait for the protective levels to rise.

Step 5. From day 7 onwards you just need to keep taking a single tablet of PrEP every day.

From day 7 onwards you just need to take a single tablet of PrEP every day.

From day 2 you just need to take a single tablet of PrEP every day. While it does not have to be at the exact same time every day, doing so can help you keep a routine. Some people set an alarm on their phone or use a pill taking app to help avoid missed tablets.

Step 6. Visit your doctor every 3 months for a new script and STI screening.

Every three months you will need to get a new prescription and STI screening tests

Regular follow up is an important part of your PrEP treatment. Every three months you will need to come back for a new prescription as well as a set of STI tests. This is a great chance to talk with your doctor about any potential side effects of issues you may have had.